A Companion to American Fiction 1780-1865 by Shirley Samuels

By Shirley Samuels

Content material:
Chapter 1 nationwide Narrative and the matter of yankee Nationhood (pages 7–19): J. Gerald Kennedy
Chapter 2 Fiction and Democracy (pages 20–30): Paul Downes
Chapter three Democratic Fictions (pages 31–39): Sandra M. Gustafson
Chapter four Engendering American Fictions (pages 40–51): Martha J. Cutter and Caroline F. Levander
Chapter five Race and Ethnicity (pages 52–63): Robert S. Levine
Chapter 6 category (pages 64–74): Philip Gould
Chapter 7 Sexualities (pages 75–86): Valerie Rohy
Chapter eight faith (pages 87–96): Paul Gutjahr
Chapter nine schooling and Polemic (pages 97–107): Stephanie Foote
Chapter 10 Marriage and agreement (pages 108–118): Naomi Morgenstern
Chapter eleven Transatlantic Ventures (pages 119–130): Wil Verhoeven and Stephen Shapiro
Chapter 12 different Languages, different Americas (pages 131–144): Kirsten Silva Gruesz
Chapter thirteen Literary Histories (pages 147–157): Michael Drexler and Ed White
Chapter 14 Breeding and examining: Chesterfieldian Civility within the Early Republic (pages 158–167): Christopher Lukasik
Chapter 15 the yank Gothic (pages 168–178): Marianne Noble
Chapter sixteen Sensational Fiction (pages 179–190): Shelley Streeby
Chapter 17 Melodrama and American Fiction (pages 191–203): Lori Merish
Chapter 18 smooth obstacles: Passing and different “Crossings” in Fictionalized Slave Narratives (pages 204–215): Cherene Sherrard?Johnson
Chapter 19 medical professionals, our bodies, and Fiction (pages 216–227): Stephanie P. Browner
Chapter 20 legislation and the yankee Novel (pages 228–238): Laura H. Korobkin
Chapter 21 exertions and Fiction (pages 239–248): Cindy Weinstein
Chapter 22 phrases for kids (pages 249–261): Carol J. Singley
Chapter 23 Dime Novels (pages 262–273): Colin T. Ramsey and Kathryn Zabelle Derounian?Stodola
Chapter 24 Reform and Antebellum Fiction (pages 274–284): Chris Castiglia
Chapter 25 the matter of the town (pages 287–300): Heather Roberts
Chapter 26 New Landscapes (pages 301–313): Timothy Sweet
Chapter 27 The Gothic Meets Sensation: Charles Brockden Brown, Edgar Allan Poe, George Lippard, and E. D. E. N. Southworth (pages 314–329): Dana Luciano
Chapter 28 Retold Legends: Washington Irving, James Kirke Paulding, and John Pendleton Kennedy (pages 330–341): Philip Barnard
Chapter 29 Captivity and Freedom: Ann Eliza Bleecker, Harriet Prescott Spofford, and Washington Irving's “Rip Van Winkle” (pages 342–352): Eric Gary Anderson
Chapter 30 New England stories: Catharine Sedgwick, Catherine Brown, and the Dislocations of Indian Land (pages 353–364): Bethany Schneider
Chapter 31 Harriet Beecher Stowe, Caroline Lee Hentz, Herman Melville, and American Racialist Exceptionalism (pages 365–377): Katherine Adams
Chapter 32 Fictions of the South: Southern photographs of Slavery (pages 378–387): Nancy Buffington
Chapter 33 The West (pages 388–399): Edward Watts
Chapter 34 The outdated Southwest: Mike Fink, Augustus Baldwin Longstreet, Johnson Jones Hooper, and George Washington Harris (pages 400–410): David Rachels
Chapter 35 James Fenimore Cooper and the discovery of the yankee Novel (pages 411–424): Wayne Franklin
Chapter 36 the ocean: Herman Melville and Moby?Dick (pages 425–433): Stephanie A. Smith
Chapter 37 nationwide Narrative and nationwide background (pages 434–444): Russ Castronovo

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Her depiction of a Kentucky bar-room offers one of the most exuberant depictions of egalitarian society in nineteenth-century fiction. 7 Uncle Tom’s Cabin explicitly calls for the egalitarian ideal depicted here to be further extended through the abolition of slavery. 8 Sympathetic characters are Stowe’s most important tool for democratic representation, but they are not her only one. The varieties of character speech that she includes in her novel contribute another democratic dimension of her text.

His Democracy is a novel of manners set in Washington high society. The action takes place at salons and dinner parties and soire´es, on outings and excursions populated by political and social elites from around the United States and Europe. There are no major African American characters. The only European immigrants are diplomats and fortune-hunting aristocrats. 5 For novelists, the primary means for making literary representation mirror political representation are three: character, style, and plot.

But nationalistic fervor did not produce national unity; Thoreau and Douglass were among many writers who opposed the war. In ‘‘Some Words with a Mummy,’’ Poe satirized the arrogance of a nation that imagined itself the epitome of progress and cultural superiority, slyly alluding to the disconcerting election of Polk. The Compromise of 1850, a last maneuver in the attempt to save the Union, marked a historical turning point and heralded a brief, spectacular flood of national narratives – Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter (1850) and The House of the Seven Gables (1851); Melville’s Moby-Dick (1851); Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin; William Wells Brown’s Clotel (1853); Thoreau’s Walden (1854); and John Rollin Ridge’s The Life and Adventures of Joaquı´n Murieta (1854), among others.

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