Green Revolution: Agricultural and Social Change in a North by Stanley A. Freed, Ruth S. Freed

By Stanley A. Freed, Ruth S. Freed

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After one brief unpleasant episode, we wrote in our notes, “There simply is no question that children and teenagers cannot be controlled nearly so much as formerly. ” The features of Western life that were of greatest interest to villagers, certainly to young men, had changed markedly. The hippies (both American and European) who were highly visible in Delhi had with little doubt created an unfortunate impression. We once were sitting and talking with three young men on the outskirts of the village.

So far, India is taking satellite TV in stride, perhaps because throughout her history, India has had to live with major external influences. In any case, global satellite television has come to India to stay. The next study of change in Shanti Nagar will focus on the village before and after the electronic revolution, just as our 1977–1978 study is oriented around the village before and after the Green Revolution, and the 1957–1959 study followed in the wake of the dramatic changes associated with Independence.

After Redfield’s (1941) definitive anthropological treatment of the bipolar model, several decades of research and criticism have shown that it does not fit particular situations too well. Gulick suggested a list of alternate characteristics which, at least for Shanti Nagar, also do not work very well. Despite its limited usefulness, the bipolar moralistic model did generate some hypotheses that we chose to explore in the 1950s study. For example, the belief that village society is “sacred” and urban society “secular” suggested the hypothesis that urban-influenced villagers would be less traditional in their religious and ceremonial lives than those who had been less exposed to urban influences.

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