Nationalism in Europe: 1850 to the Present by Stuart Woolf

By Stuart Woolf

Nationalism is nearly most unlikely to not establish oneself with a geographical region, and but nationalism is traditionally a contemporary phenomenon. This reader of vintage texts attracts on authors spanning a chronological interval and from quite a few ecu nations - together with John Stuart Mill and Otto Bauer - to discover the subject matter of nationalism in Europe. It presents texts lengthy sufficient for the undergraduate pupil to check seriously, and makes to be had the important construction blocks for theoretical dialogue.

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Extra resources for Nationalism in Europe: 1850 to the Present

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The best known historical example is the outbreak of war in 1914, but the imposition of national loyalties and values in newly annexed territories such as Alsace or Alto Adige, or on any ethnic or cultural minority regarded (and regarding itself) as ‘different’, has inevitably, and usually deliberately, been generative of conflict. These examples point to the complexity of what was (and is) understood by national identity. The nationalist appropriation of the concept—propagated universally as official doctrine—has accustomed us to equate it with identification with the state, to the point that, in a world of nation states, the ‘nation’ has only regained its autonomy in the face of the failure of the state.

1973), Nationalism and the International System, London. J. (1990), Nations and Nationalism since 1780, Cambridge. E. (eds) (1977), The Invention of Tradition, Cambridge. Hroch, M. (1989), Social Preconditions of National Revival in Europe, Cambridge. Hughes, M. (1988), Nationalism and Society. Germany 1800–1945, London. Hutchinson, J. (1994), Modern Nationalism, London. D. (eds) (1994), Nationalism, Oxford. Kamenka, E. ) (1976), Nationalism. The Nature and Evolution of an Idea, London. L. (1984), Mourir pour la patrie et autres textes, Paris.

The best known historical example is the outbreak of war in 1914, but the imposition of national loyalties and values in newly annexed territories such as Alsace or Alto Adige, or on any ethnic or cultural minority regarded (and regarding itself) as ‘different’, has inevitably, and usually deliberately, been generative of conflict. These examples point to the complexity of what was (and is) understood by national identity. The nationalist appropriation of the concept—propagated universally as official doctrine—has accustomed us to equate it with identification with the state, to the point that, in a world of nation states, the ‘nation’ has only regained its autonomy in the face of the failure of the state.

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